ALERT // Fall 2017 Finals Schedule for Highland High School (Block schedule for Highland Middle School)

Curriculum

From graduation requirements to class offerings, learn about the curriculum at Highland High School.

Requirements for Graduation

Students must successfully complete the courses required by the board and the Iowa Department of Education in order to graduate.

 

It shall be the responsibility of the superintendent to ensure that students complete grades one through twelve and that high school students complete 48 credits prior to graduation. The following credits will be required:

32 required credits plus 16 electives = 48 credits
(One credit equals one semester of course work)

All students are required to successfully complete:

Physical Education: 4 full years (2 credits) required by law except for students with a medical excuse or by meeting the requirements of Section 256.11(5)(g) of the Code of Iowa.

A student must attend high school four years (exception with board approval) or more, and be registered for a minimum of six academic courses at all times, plus physical education. Extra courses may be taken for educational enrichment.

A student will be allowed no more than two extra-curricular music credits counted toward graduation and none will be averaged toward the student's grade point average. Music participants can earn only 1/2 credit each year, regardless of the number of music organizations in which they are active.

A student will be allowed to take a maximum of three classes from an Iowa accredited community college (Ex: Kirkwood) that offers high school core courses towards graduation requirements.

Successful driver education participants may earn only 1/2 semester credit for the course.

The required courses of study will be reviewed by the board annually.

Graduation requirements for special education students will be in accordance with the prescribed course of study as described in their Individualized Education Program (IEP). Each student's IEP will include a statement of the projected date of graduation at least 18 months in advance of the projected date and the criteria to be used in determining whether graduation will occur. Prior to the special education student's graduation, the IEP team shall determine whether the graduation criteria have been met.

 

Each student will receive a grade report at the end of each nine weeks grading period. Midway through each grading period, a report will be sent to the parents/guardians of any student who is having academic problems. Parent conferences will be held in the fall and the spring of the school year. Additionally, teachers may send progress reports at any time during the school year.

Early Graduation
Students who plan to graduate early must contact the school guidance counselor during the spring of their junior year. Application for early graduation must be filed with he counselor by the fall of their senior year. Early graduation must be approved by the Highland School Board.

Post Secondary Enrollment Options
High school students may receive credits that count toward graduation requirements for successfully completing courses at community colleges, private colleges, or the state universities. The District may pay up to $250 for the 11th and 12th grade students. The district pays only for courses which are not offered by the high school and are offered during the regular school year by the institution of higher learning. The district will collect a $250 deposit, at registration, for any post-secondary class taken. The check, will be returned, at the end of the class if the student has NOT withdrawn or failed. The district does not provide funds for summer school classes; however, summer school classes may be eligible for credit.

Students interested in participating in this program should contact the school guidance counselor for more detailed information concerning post-secondary enrollment options and the specific information related to funds provided by the district.

This enrollment option should not be confused with enrollment at Kirkwood Community College to satisfy credit deficiencies for graduation requirements.

High School Course Descriptions

Fine Arts

Course 0100
Art Drawing I/Painting I

Length: Semester
Prerequisite: None
Required Materials: A pencil is the only required equipment, but students may choose to purchase their own equipment and supplies.
Grade Level: 9 10 11 12

Drawing I: Students will concentrate on basic elements of drawing and techniques. This class will introduce students to a variety of materials and techniques that can be used. Students taking this course need not have any drawing or art experience, but they will explore various approaches to drawing that will improve their own basic skills in areas of accuracy, abstraction, composition and the elements of design.

Painting I: In the painting class students will study areas of composition, design, color, painting, and materials. They will study a variety of techniques while painting landscapes, portraits, and still life's, pop art, and canvasses.

Course 0101
Sculpture/Ceramics I
Length: Semester
Prerequisite: None
Required Materials:
Grade Level: 10 11 12

Sculpture: This course will involve the students with the fundamentals of sculpture, space relationship, and criticism as they work with traditional and modern sculpture materials and projects. Realism, expressionism, pop art, and minimal art will be the major areas explored.

Ceramics I: This class will involve students with basic ceramic processes. These areas of work will include properties of clay, construction methods, functional pottery, glazes, techniques of modeling and sculpture, wheel throwing and firing techniques.

Course 0102
Art III
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Art I and II
Required Materials: Basic art materials and equipment will be supplied; however, the students may need to provide the materials for specialized projects of their design.
Grade Level: 11 12
Course Description: Art III is open to any student who has completed Art I and Art II, and to any transfer student who has completed two academic years of secondary art classes. This is an advanced art course intended for those students considering some type of post secondary education in art, and students who would like to concentrate their focus in studio art and explore in detail a particular medium. It is modeled after a college level studio class. The student in the class is expected to develop a program of study that focuses on a limited number of media, make challenging choices that build on skills acquired in previous art classes, and complete a portfolio of work, Students can expect some written assignments and research in addition to the studio work. Elements of art history will be incorporated into each lesson.

Vocational Agriculture

Course 0201
Introduction to Agriculture
Length: 1 semester (yearly)
Grade Level: 9-12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: This course begins with an introduction to the program in Agriculture Science, followed by an overview of agriculture and a study of careers in agriculture. Instruction in the area of leadership includes FFA Parliamentary Procedure. Agriculture Mechanics instruction includes beginning arc welding.

Course 0202
Soil and Plant Science
Length: 1 semester (yearly)
Grade Level: 9-12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Soil and Plant Science provides knowledge about the propagation of plants for food and fiber. Soil science, irrigation, pest and weed control, food and fiber processing, and farm operations are possible topics covered within this course.

Course 0203
Agriculture Mechanics
Length: 1 semester (yearly)
Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Agriculture Mechanics courses provide the skills and knowledge specifically applicable to the tools and equipment used in the agriculture industry. In learning to apply basic industrial knowledge and skills (engines, power, welding, and carpentry, among others), a broad range of topics may be explored, including the operation, mechanics, and care of farm tools and machines; the construction and repair of structures integral to farm operations; an introduction or review of electricity and power; and safety procedures. The student will be required to have their own safety glasses for this class.

Course 0204
Animal Science
Length: 2nd semester (yearly)
Grade Level: 9-12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Animal Science second semester includes information about the history, care, and management of domestic and farm animals. Animal nutrition, health, genetics, reproduction facilities, products processing, and marketing are all possible topics covered in this course. Students may study a particular species (swine, cattle, horses, fowl, sheep, etc.)

Course 0205
Horticulture
Length: 2nd semester (yearly)
Grade Level: 9-12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Designed for students interested in the art and science of growing plants, shrubs, trees, flowers, fruits, and vegetables. General Horticulture courses cover a wide variety of topics, including greenhouse and nursery operation, orchard management, vegetable production, turf/golf course management, interior and exterior plantscaping, irrigation systems, weed and pest control, and floral design.

Course 0206
Agriculture Business Management
Length: 2nd semester (yearly)
Grade Level: 10-12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Agriculture Business Management courses provide students with the information and skills necessary for career success in agribusiness and in the operation of entrepreneurial ventures in the agricultural industry. Management courses may cover topics such as economic principles, budgeting, risk management, finance, business law, marketing and promotion strategies, insurance, and resource management. Other possible topics include development of a business plan, employee/employer relations, problem solving and decision making, using computers in agribusiness, and building leadership skills. A survey of the careers within the agriculture industry might also be incorporated into this course.

Course 0207
Agriculture Production (KCC)
Length: 1st Semester
Grade: Junior of Senior Standing
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Presents instruction in crop and plant classification, use and identification. Also covers cropping systems, tillage methods, planting and harvesting methods and crop growth patterns. It is a balance of theoretical and practical crop sciences.

Course 0208
Agriculture Technology (KCC)
Length: 2nd Semester
Grade: Junior or Senior Standing
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: This course is to familiarize students with basic computer applications in using currently available software.

Music

Course 0300
High School Band
Course Description: Instrumental music education is offered to all high school students. A minimum proficiency level is required to participate in band. Private lessons are offered to any student who is interested in becoming a band member. High school band members perform in the Highland Huskies Marching Band and the Highland Concert Band. Many additional performing opportunities are available such as Highland Jazz Band, Pep Band, Solo and Small Ensemble performances, and numerous festival honor bands. The Highland band is very active in contests, concerts, and parades. Private instruction is available to any band member. The band rehearses every other day.

Course 0500
Senior High Choir
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: None
Grade Level: 9 10 11 12
Course Description: Choral Music is a two-semester, elective course designed for students in grades 9-12. Students will sing a variety of classical and contemporary literature in order to enhance proper vocal technique, develop music literacy, improve sight-reading skills, and develop an appreciation for and an understanding of other cultures' music. Choir, which meets 2-3 times a per week, is open to all students. Pitch matching and retention are essential for successful ensemble participation. Refined singing requires the student to work collectively, individually, accurately, and attentively. To achieve these aims, the director will provide private and class instruction/activities. Private lessons are encouraged, as scheduling allows, for all choral students. Singers will be required to perform in concert with this ensemble.

Business Technology

Course 0460
Word Processing
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: A beginning course on IBM compatible computers stressing knowledge and speed of keyboarding. Students will complete units on letters, memos, reports, timed writings, and basic word processing functions.

Course 0450
General Business
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: A beginning course on personal finance issues such as credit, checking accounts, renting, purchasing, saving, career planning, and contracts.

Course 0430
Computer Application I and II
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Word Processing
Course Description: Students learn the basics of computer components (hardware, software, memory, etc.). Students will learn a variety of software programs including word processing, spreadsheets, presentation, and database programs. A unit covering the Internet will be available during the fourth quarter. Students work independently each quarter to produce an allotted number of hours of credit.

Course 0400
Accounting I
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status
10th with teacher and counselor approval (successful completion Algebra I recommended, but not required)
Course Description: This course introduces the basic concepts of accounting, and how they apply to service and merchandising industries. Students work through most exercises manually to reinforce the concepts learned. Spreadsheets will be used so students gain valuable learning experience creating accounting reports and enhancing the students' computer skills. Students will complete a simulation (practice set) of a business to apply the accounting concepts and knowledge learned.

Course 0410
Accounting II
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Accounting I
Course Description: This course expands on the basic concepts learned in Accounting I, and features more advanced accounting practices and theory for students to comprehend. Mostly the course focuses on the corporate aspect of accounting principles. Students will learn about notes, depreciation, inventory, and corporate income.

Course 0441
Entrepreneurship
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Junior and Senior status
Course Description: Entrepreneurship courses acquaint students with the knowledge and skills necessary to won and operate their own business. topics from several fields typically form the course content:economics, marketing principles, human relations and psychology, business and labor law, legal rights and responsibilities of ownership, business and financial planning, finance and accounting, and communication. Several topics surveyed in Business Management courses may also be included.

Course 0420
Business Law
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status
Course Description: This course focuses on common law for students in their personal and workplace settings. Many areas are covered such as: contracts, torts, employment laws, and more serious law issues.

Course 0470
Desktop Publishing (Dual Credit HS & College) KCC
Length: 1 Semester
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status (Offered every other year)
Course Description:

Course 0471
Web Page Design (Dual Credit HS & College) KCC
Length: 1 Semester
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status (Offered every other year)
Course Description:

Course 0472
Advanced Computer Business App. (Dual Credit HS & College) KCC
Length: 1 Semester
Prerequisite: Accounting Concepts (Offered every other year)
Course Description: Extends students' basic knowledge of Microsoft Office Professional software applications including Word, Access, Excel and Power Point. Students will use practical problems to illustrate business applications.

Course 0473
Introduction to Multimedia (Dual Credit HS & College) KCC
Length: 1 Semester
Prerequisite: Offered every other year
Course Description: Develops knowledge of multimedia concepts by studying multimedia software and the hardware components that are needed to develop and view multimedia products. Assessment projects will be used by students for demonstration of knowledge of multimedia elements (copyright, video, graphics, sound, and animation), knowledge of tools (digital camera, video camera, scanner cams), and knowledge of editing software (sound, video and graphics editing).

English

Course 1140
English I
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: None (Freshman requirement)
Course Description: English 9 is a required, one year course divided into two parts: literature and writing. Each quarter students will explore and analyze different literary components through the study of short stories, plays, and novels. At the same time, students will develop their sentence, paragraph, and essay writing skills.

Course 1105
American Literature
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior, department approval required for admission
Course Description: American Literature is an intensive one semester, college preparatory course that examines the origins and themes of American literature from the 16th century through the 20th century, Students will study major topics of American literature through the close reading and examination of short stories, essays, novels, and poetry. Students are expected to participate daily as well as complete short quizzes and lengthy essay assignments. Also, students will have a major report on an American writing of their choosing. There is a required summer reading assignment to be completed by the first day of class.

Course 1180
Basic Composition
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Department approval required for admission ( Juniors or Seniors )
Course Description: This one semester, college preparatory course, emphasizes expository writing. Students learn to use words and a variety of sentence and paragraph styles to create different types of essays including comparison/contrast, persuasive, argumentative, and descriptive essays. There will be daily writing assignments and weekly essays. Students will develop their pre-writing, and revision skills. They will learn to constructively criticize their own writing as well as other students' writing.

Course 1145
English 10
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: English 9
Course Description: English 10 is a required, two semester course designed to build on the basic skills of language arts and build upon the higher order skills introduced in ninth grade English. Nine units are developed in the course to integrate the language skills of reading, writing, speaking and expression, and comprehension skills of listening, viewing, logic, and analysis. The units progress logically, providing the basic skills for the next unit.

Course 1175
World Literature
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: American Literature
Course Description: Through intensive reading, writing, thinking, and studying about the most respected literature produced through the ages, the student will gain a greater respect and understanding of literature and themselves. World Literature is an elective, one semester course, designed to build literary thinking skills in the college bound student. The course outlines the movement of western civilization through literature and attempts to provide a basis in the humanities for the senior student.
Ten units are developed in the course to integrate the language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and expression, and the comprehension skills of analysis, inference, logic, and drawing conclusions. The units progress logically around a thematic presentation, providing the basic core knowledge and skills for the next unit.

Course 1100
Advanced Composition
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Basic Composition
Course Description: Along with the writing process model of instruction, a workshop approach will be utilized. Writing isn't actually taught. That is, writing isn't a set of facts, forms, or formulas that a teacher imparts, and it certainly isn't busywork or a series of skills to be learned sequentially. Writing is a student-centered activity that is learned through a variety of writing experiences. In a workshop approach, the writing teacher's most important function is to provide the proper mix of freedom, encouragement, assignments, and expert guidance so that the students may learn by doing. The teacher functions much like an understanding parent or a personal mentor. In the workshop approach, students work and learn individually, in small groups, and in large groups. Instruction is based on need-when a student or a group of students need help with basic skill or concept. Some full-class instruction is needed, but the needs of the individual are central to successful writing instruction. The basic form of instruction within this workshop consists of a series of mini-lessons or full-class activities and individual work days for individual instruction and small group instruction based on specific student needs. The program is designed to promote active learning in an integrated system; for example, whole language (thematic) approaches, the personal experience approach, and the invention approach are unutilized along with the writing process and the workshop approach to facilitate active learning among students.

Course 1155
Language Lab
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Language Lab is an elective, one semester course designed to build on the basic skills of language arts, composition, communication, speaking, listening, and survival with the English language. The course attempts to provide some basic language skills for students who are not college bound and who had difficulty with English/language arts in the past.
Six basic units are developed in the course to integrate the language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Additionally, basic survival type skills are integrated in the course to enhance the student's real world use of language. Through daily writing, reading, talking, and thinking about the English language and the many forms used in its expression, the students will learn to use their language as a tool for their own success.

Course 1170
Speech
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Speech is a required, one semester course designed to build on the basic skills of language arts and build upon the higher order skills introduced in ninth and tenth grade English. Twelve units are developed in the course to integrate the language skills of reading, writing, speaking and expression, and the comprehension skills of listening, viewing, logic, and analysis. The units progress logically, providing the basic skills for the next unit.

Course 1125
Creative Writing
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: A variety of instructional approaches will be utilized during this one semester creative writing course to better serve the students on an individual basis. A sound writing program should draw from all of the significant research available on the subject of writing. A particular program won't, for example, be based solely on the writing process approach or on whole language learning. Instead, it will be a blend for incorporation of approaches. The writing teacher needs to know when and how to utilize each approach for each student.
In writing workshop, students write every day or work on writing-related issues (reading, researching, critiquing, participating in editing sessions, eat.). They are expected to keep all of their work in writing folders, and they are expected to produce a predetermined number of finished pieces by the end of the semester. The student is encouraged to take risks, to experiment with new forms, ideas, and techniques. Support during each writing project comes from peer and teacher conferences. Students utilize the steps in the writing process to develop their writing. The teacher acts as a guide and facilitator. He creates a classroom environment that is conducive to the workshop approach.

Course 1120
Contemporary Literature
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: A workshop approach will be used in this one semester reading class. In this approach, students learn that reading, real reading, is a process of discovery and exploration rather than an end product or a series of skills. With approach, the students will read almost every day or work on reading-related issues. The teacher (with student input) chooses a theme which serves as a focal point for an intense and thorough whole language experience-that is an experience which immerses students in integrated reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities. The focus on this approach is simple: students enjoy reading and find in meaningful if it stems from their personal experience, choices, and observations. The basic format for instruction within this workshop will consist of several thematic mini-lessons used as a pre-reading activity for the book selections.

Course 1190
Forms of Literature (Dual Credit HS & College) KCC
Length: 1 semester (Spring)
Prerequisite: Composition I
Course Description: Explores through short stories, novels, films, and critical theory the following questions: What is fiction? What are its common elements? How does understanding these elements and the ways they interconnect affect our understanding of how fiction is crafted, read, and interpreted. How is fiction different from or similar to other forms of literary expression?

Course 1191
Composition I (Dual Credit HS & College) KCC
Length: 1 semester (fall)
Prerequisite: Qualifying placement score
Course Description: Develops expository writing with emphasis on organization, supporting details, style, vocabulary and library research skills.

Course 1192
Composition II (Dual Credit HS & College) KCC
Length: 1 semester (winter)
Prerequisite: Composition I (Dual credit HS & College)
Course Description: Develops expository writing with emphasis on the substance, organization, support, style, form and format. The course teaches precise and responsible use of research tools and MLA citation techniques. The students are required to use analysis of reading materials in the curriculum content area, current essay issues and techniques and literature in the discovery of expository forms. Additionally, the course develops the student's ability to use ethical and logical arguments.

Course 1185
Independent Reading (not offered at this time)
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Senior High Independent reading is designed for those students who would benefit from additional developmental reading instruction. Reading strategies and techniques will be emphasized in this individualized course to promote the comprehension of text and increase the student's reading ability. Reading will be used frequently, independently and continuously in a variety of materials and reading situations to promote a personally satisfying effect. A student must read to learn to read, and the student must read extensively to learn to read well. The reading experiences which compromise the major thrust of this independent reading course fall into two basic patterns: sustained individual reading in a variety of collateral sources to implement classroom oriented learning and problem-solving activities, and personal fulfillment reading, to satisfy individual needs, widen the reader's interests, and deepen the readers appreciation of significant writing.

Journalism

Course 2010
Annual
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: (Non - English Credit) Elective
Course Description: Students in this course produce the yearbook for the school. Advertisement sales, creating page layouts, photography, interviewing, and writing articles are some of the many activities in which students will participate. Because the students will be utilizing PageMaker, the most prominent professional page-layout software, they will gain skills necessary for any advertising, publishing, or graphic arts career. Commitment to our goals of creating a high quality yearbook is a necessary requirement of all students in this course.

Family and Consumer Science

Course 0920
Foods I
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status (sophomores with instructor approval)
Course Description: We begin with food preservation, learning about whys and how's as well as the history. We can dehydrate, jelly, and freeze. These products are saved and used later in class. The microwave is so much a part of today's cooking that we look at how it works and how that affects the cooking techniques used when microwaving. The dietary guidelines for Americans leads us through what we should eat, how to prepare what we should eat, and why we should eat this way. We take each guideline and study it and learn how to prepare the foods properly to follow that guideline. This course has a good mix of study and kitchen time.

Course 0921
Foods II
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Foods I
Course Description: Using what we learned in semester one, students work to plan meal to achieve the dietary guidelines. Using menus collected from local restaurants, we look at eating healthy, as well. Students will be preparing meals, looking at nutrition, appeal characteristics, and resource management. With resource management the major concern we look at is kitchen planning and arrangement to make the most efficient use of time and energy spent there. Consumerism is a skill we will develop, learning to read labels, shop wisely, and avoid the traps of the supermarket. Cooking techniques will be practiced and skills developed so the money spent on food leads to edible food. We will explore our country's varied foods and preparation techniques to learn more about our own diversity and to appreciate it. We will look to the factors that cause this diversity in foods for a better understanding of our own eating habits. After looking at our U. S. foods, we will explore foreign foods to add to the variety in our meals. We will also explore careers related to the food industry by forming our own food business. In the past, students have sold pizza at noon, served Madrigal dinner, and grilled hamburgers for sale at lunch time.

Course 0960
Parenting
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Junior and Senior status
Course Description: Parenting is approached with the idea that everyone is involved in the nurturing of others. So how does one nurture another, what are the basic needs of human beings, and how does having them met or not, effect people? We look at the rights and responsibilities of children and their care givers, often developing a new perspective on our own relationship with care givers. We look at positive parenting skills and conflict resolution skills. The Baby Think It Over Doll is used by the class to get a more realistic idea of what parenting a newborn is like. We observe children at other ages to learn more about development and what is normal. An interesting class with lots of class discussion, thought, and writing of personal feelings and opinions.

Course 0970
Young Adult Living
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status
Course Description: We begin with goal setting and how one goes about achieving their goals. With their goals in mind, we go on to careers. We use the computer lab to explore the possibilities that go along with our goals and abilities. Students will choose and occupation and the starting wage for the job. Using that wage, the students will plan a budget. We will go over the possibilities of how to spend their money and the students will make the choices that best suit their goals. We cover housing, food, clothing, car, insurance, furnishings, and credit. Once the nuts and bolts of financial planning are covered, we look at relationships, courtship, marriage, family, parenting, as well as the changes of getting older and our responsibilities to others. This is a real hands on course and students will leave with a budget that could be used in their future.

Course 0930
General Home Economics
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: 9 10 11 12
Course Description: This is a practical, realistic and applicable skill course for students of all ages. The topics will be covered in ways to meet interests and needs of the population of the class. Topics covered: how to get what you want in life, how to feed and nourish yourself and others, how to get the perfect job, how to make a house a home, how do I have a happy family, how do I manage money, how do I make consumer choices, and how to use the sewing machine. The class will be very hands on, using labs, projects, computers, field trips and class discussion to increase your skills for living.

Course 0900
Creative Fabrics
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: 9 10 11 12
Course Description: This sewing class is for a student who wishes to develop skill in the use of the sewing machine to construct articles. This will be a lab class. Students will choose projects according to their interests, skills, cost, and goals. Possible projects: quilts, curtains, clothing, and accessories. Students will practice and develop workplace skills such as technical reading, time management and attention to detail.

Foreign Language - Spanish

Course 0710
Spanish I
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: First year Spanish is a year long course open to all high school students, but recommended to freshman. This is the first class in a series of four. In Spanish I the main goal is to develop the ability to understand and respond to simple spoken and written Spanish. A wide variety of materials and activities are used in class including the textbook, workbook, activity sheets, dialogues, videos, eat.. Daily assignments and weekly phrases will be given, as well as frequent quizzes. Students will be expected to study vocabulary daily. The main topics covered in Spanish I include present and past verb tenses foods, celebrations, how to get around the city, sports, school life, and the cultures and customs of the different people around the world (and in the U.S.) who speak Spanish.

Course 0720
Spanish II
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: At least a C grade in Spanish I
Course Description: Spanish II is a year long course and is the second in a series of four. Second year Spanish is a continuation of Spanish I, taking time to review the concepts learned in the first year, and expanding on the students' basic knowledge of the language. The main goal is to learn the different verb tenses and increase the students' vocabulary. Daily assignments, weekly phrases and frequent quizzes will be given. Daily vocabulary practice is a must! The topics covered in Spanish II will include present tense, past tenses and future tenses of verbs, commands, and an introduction of the subjunctive tense. It will also include situations like traveling, camping, news items, family, free time, fashion, health, and discussing the different cultures and customs of those who speak Spanish.

Course 0730
Spanish III
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: At least a C grade in Spanish II
Course Description: Spanish III is the third class in a series of four, and is highly recommended to those going to a four-year college. The goal of third-year Spanish is to be able to understand spoken and written Spanish at a more advanced level than Spanish II. Spanish III includes a review and more in depth study of many of the grammatical concepts of 1st and 2nd year Spanish, including the subjunctive tense, the imperative, the imperfect, and preterite tenses. There will be more in depth study of the past tenses, and prepositions and adjectives. Speaking completely in Spanish will be strongly emphasized. There will be daily assignments and frequent quizzes. Spanish III students will also be expected to keep a journal in Spanish, where they may write skits, summarize short stories, eat.. They will also read a short novel el Ojo de Agua. Various cultural aspects of Hispanic countries will be studied through readings, reports, presentations, and discussions.

Course 0740
Spanish IV
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: At least a C grade in Spanish III
Course Description: The main goal of Spanish IV is to continue to increase the language proficiency in the areas of speaking, reading, listening, and in culture. More complex grammatical structures will be studied and learned, including the use of the subjunctive after prepositions, the past subjunctive, eat.. In addition to the textbook, the students will read two novels, el Verano Misterioso and el Enredo. Other readings will include stories and legends from Latin American countries. The students will also do certain projects including a report on a country in Spanish and writing a children's story in the language.

Industrial Technology

Course 1000
Construction
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Manual Drafting
Required Materials: Safety glasses
Course Description: Designed to help our young people understand how our constructed environment is built. We still study site, designing, managing, building structures, finishing, and the closing of a contract. The class will include the explanation of construction careers, how products of the world are used, and multiple types of construction. Students will be involved in the construction and sale of class projects and will be responsible for purchasing materials for individual wood projects. The students will be graded on individual and group projects that are completed.

Course 1030
Manual Drafting
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Required Materials: Drafting Pencils
Course Description: Students will learn to use drafting equipment, sketching, single, two, and three dimensional, and on scale drafting. Computer aided drafting will be introduced. Drafting equipment will be provided.

Course 1060
Technical Drafting
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Manual Drafting
Course Description: All work will be done with computer aided drafting programs. Students will learn one, two, and three dimensional drafting following a tutorial drafting manual. Self paced work may include a team approach in shared computer techniques. Drawings will be printed with a plotter to show a professionally finished product.

Course 1020
Introduction to Technology
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Students will explore the world of technology via computers. Programs may include: CD ROM, Crop Sight: true world coordinates used to map agricultural fields, soils, and slopes; Desk Top Publishing: the production of journals, newsletters, time lines, signs and other print material with the integration of graphics; Flight Simulator; learn the principles of aero dynamics, meteorology, weight and balance, and hands-on simulated flight; Computer Aided Drafting: to learn the basics of computer drafting: Windows and Windows applications of DOS, CNC Technology, these include computer lathe, mill, robot, and laser; TV editing, Auto Desk Animation Software to be used with computer aided drafting along with scripting capabilities.

Course 1050
Production/Manufacturing Technology
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: None
Required Materials: Safety Glasses
Course Description: The main emphasis of this course will include the study of metals and their applications. You will learn basic arc welding, acetylene welding and cutting, wire welding and soldering. Students will design, build, and sell class projects. They will also be responsible for the cost of individual projects. Hands-on applications will include: CNC lathe, mill, robotics, energy and power, and laser. Class projects will include production of materials from CNC equipment.

Course 1040
Power Mechanics
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Required Materials: Safety glasses
Course Description: This course involves the study of small engines, engine operation, engine disassembly, and assembly. Proper use of hand and power tools in the repair of equipment will also be involved. Students will need to locate a 4 cycle (lawn mower) small engine for disassembly and assembly.

Course 1070
Woodworking I
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Required Materials: Safety glasses
Course Description: Students will be introduced to both power and hand tools used in woodworking. There will be hands on practice with these tools. Students will choose individual projects they wish to make. Students are responsible for the cost of individual projects. If there are woodworking projects that would benefit our school, students may work individually or as a group to fill a need. The school would supply need materials in this case.

Course 1071
Woodworking II
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: Woodworking I
Required Materials: Safety glasses
Course Description: A continuation of Woodworking I, which is a prerequisite. Students will be introduced to advanced machines, tools, and techniques of woodworking. Students will create more advanced projects. Students are responsible for the cost of material for individual projects. Students may also work individually, or in a group, to produce projects for the school's use. The school will supply the needed material for such projects. In Woodworking II, students will be more individually responsible for safely working in the shop, and need to be self directed workers as they work in the shop.

Course 1080
Auto Academy
Length: 1 Year
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status (Must have successfully completed Algebra I)
Required Materials: None
Course Description:
Fundamentals of Auto Servicing: This provides student an introductory overview of automotive servicing from a maintenance and replacement standpoint. Classroom and hands-on activities emphasize routine maintenance procedures in at the care of tires, batteries, belts, lighting, hoses, filters, and cooling systems. This course presents information on auto-related careers, local employers, goal setting, skill inventory and developing a personal plan.
Industrial Math: This covers basic math skills relating to micrometers, torque wrenches, and engine measurement and displacement. Learn dimensional analysis and significant digit concepts and practice solving real-world problems. This course also covers introductory algebra concepts.

Math

Math Pathways

8th Grade 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade
Math 8 General Math Pre-Algebra Algebra I Geometry
Math 8 General Math Pre-Algebra Algebra I Consumer
Math 8 General Math Pre-Algebra Consumer Algebra I
Math 8 General Math Algebra I Geometry Algebra II
Math 8 General Math Algebra I Geometry Consumer
Math 8 General Math Algebra I Consumer Geometry
Math 8 Pre-Algebra Algebra I Geometry Algebra II
Math 8 Pre-Algebra Algebra I Geometry Consumer
Math 8 Pre-Algebra Algebra I Consumer Geometry
Math 8 Pre-Algebra Consumer Algebra I Geometry
Math 8 Pre-Algebra General Math Algebra I Geometry
Math 8 Pre-Algebra General Math Algebra I Consumer
Math 8 Pre-Algebra General Math Consumer Algebra I
Math 8 Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Algebra III
Math 8 Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Consumer
Math 8 Algebra I Geometry Consumer Algebra II
Math 8 Algebra I Consumer Geometry Algebra II
Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Algebra III Pre-Calculus
Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Algebra III Consumer
Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Consumer Algebra III
Algebra I Geometry Consumer Algebra II Algebra III
Algebra I Consumer Geometry Algebra II Algebra III

Note: Consumer Math has a Pre-Algebra or Algebra I prerequisite.
Note: Students who successfully complete Algebra I will not be allowed to enroll in General Math.

Course 1230
General Math I
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Math 8
Course Description: A two semester course designed for the student who isn't quite ready for the Pre-Algebra or Algebra route yet. It is a course that is aimed at targeting the basic skills needed to advance onto the next level. This goal is accomplished by stressing the comprehension of fundamentals.

Course 1275
Applied Math
Length: 1 Year
Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra or Algebra I, Geometry
Course Description: This course reinforces general math skills for students who have previously attained these skills These skills may be extended to include some Pre-Algebra and Algebra topics. The class may explore a wide variety of practical, consumer, business, and occupational applications..
.

Course 1200
Algebra I
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Math 8 and/or Pre-Algebra
Course Description: A college prep class where the concept of the variable is explored. Manipulation, application, and graphic representation are emphasized the entire year. Word problem solving is integrated throughout the year. This course is for students that enjoy math and/or have had success in Math 8 or Pre-Algebra.

Course 1220
Consumer Math
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra or Algebra I
Course Description: A two semester course aimed at the student who has already completed at least one year of mathematics. The focus in on the application of "real life" mathematical problems that the students will have to deal with in everyday life.

Course 1240
Basic Geometry
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Course Description: This course studies Euclidean Geometry. This course emphasizes formal proof, problem solving, and algebraic ideas integrated with Geometry. This year round course is for college bound students who have had success in Algebra I. Required by many secondary institutions.

Course 1241
Advanced Geometry
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Course Description:

Course 1210
Algebra II
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry
Course Description: Basic algebraic concepts are reviewed and extended. Problem solving and graphic representation is emphasized. Quadratics are studied in depth and trigonometric functions are introduced. This year long course is for college bound students who have had success in Geometry and Algebra I. Required by many secondary institutions.

Course 1290
Pre-Calculus
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Three years of math
Course Description: A two semester course designed for the upper level mathematics student who plans on entering college and majoring in an area associated with mathematics. This course will prepare the student for entrance into a college calculus course.

Course 1291
Calculus
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus
Course Description:

Other advanced courses in math may be offered if schedules can be worked out. Example: Statistics.

Physical Education

Course 1400
Health
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None (required for education)
Course Description: This course is open to any student grade 9-12. It presents material high school students need in order to understand how to become and stay healthy. The class is geared to adolescent students who are not only reaching physical maturity but also assuming responsibility for many behavior patterns that will affect their health throughout their lives.

Course 1410
Physical Education
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: This class is designed to promote fitness for both now and throughout the students' lives. A wide variety of physical activities are presented with skills through individual and group activities in order to help each student find activities they can take a personal interest in pursuing now and into adulthood.

Course 1401
Health Academy KCC
Length: 3 semesters (three to four periods a day)
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status
Course Description:

Science

Course 1650
Physical Science
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Freshman Requirement
Course Description: Explore the world of Newton, Pascal, and Archimedes and more. Learn about their observations, principles, and laws, each explaining occurrences we take for granted every day. This class is required for all freshman.

Course 1600
Biology
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Physical Science
Course Description: This required course of all Highland graduates explores various life science concepts, such as organization, evolution theories, the cell as the basic unit of life, ecology (interaction between organisms and their environment) and the unique features of various living things. Biology students are expected to realize everyday applications of science, have a "hands-on" approach to course material, and develop and appreciation for science.

Course 1605
Advanced Biology (offered every other year)
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Biology
Course Description: This course covers issues similar to those of biology, with a more detailed approach. Students review and explore, in more depth, biological concepts such as cellular structure and function, human anatomy and physiology and the interaction between organisms and their environment. Emphasis includes the relationship between the study of life science and the practical applications in modern society.

Course 1610
Human Biology
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status (Dual Credit HS & College)
Course Description: This course is designed to help students to achieve a basic understanding of four aspects of human biology-cellular, genetic, physiological, and ecological-evolutionary. The course is targeted towards students considering further study in the biological sciences or health care career fields.

Course 1615
Chemistry
Length: 1 year (students may enroll for 1 semester as long as the other students aren't bumped and class size is not compromised)
Prerequisite: Biology
Course Description: This science course exposes students to the composition of substances (both natural and man-made materials). Through intensive lab work and problem-solving, students learn about the periodic table of the elements, chemical reactions, and basic laws of nature. Most work is done in small groups and students must be willing to spend time outside of class working with their team.

Course 1620
Environmental Science
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Biology
Course Description: This course focuses on current science issues. Strong emphasis is placed on environmental topics. Other concepts that are explored include diseases, the role of science in society, governmental activities, bioethics, and individual responsibility concerning science in the 21st century. Much of this class is composed of student-led research, community involvement, and students direct many of these activities.

Course 1660
Physics
Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Biology
Course Description: This advanced science course explores "how the universe works". Students are expected to apply their math and logic skills to various physics concepts such as motion, forces, machines, light, sound, and electricity. Students will also be exposed to astronomy, various scientists, the history of science, career opportunities, and everyday applications of physics. Hands-on activities, group work, student-led investigation, and guest speakers make up most of the course.

Social Studies

Course 1730
U.S. History from 1877
Length: 1 year (required)
Prerequisite: Freshman status (8th grade course completion preferred)
Course Description: This U.S. history survey course begins with the post-Reconstruction, industrial era of American history and chronicles the social, political, economic, and cultural development of "modern America". Historical events are put in their proper context and students are shown how they relate to modern issues in U.S. society and politics.

Course 1770
World History
Length: 1 year
Prerequisites: Sophomore status & successful completion of U.S. History from 1877
Course Description: A comprehensive view of the history of the world will be discovered beginning with "Pre-historic" times and showing the advancement of civilization to the "Modern Period". The focus of the course is on a world-view but includes the history of the western world. This basic course will prepare students for more advanced historical studies later in high school and college.

Course 1740
American Government
Length: 1 semester (required)
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status & successful completion of World History
Course Description: The heritage, development, organization, and structure of American government is explored in the required course with an emphasis the elements of democracy and citizen participation. The primary goal of this course is to prepare all students for a lifetime of citizenship in our democratic republic.

Course 1780
Economics
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status
Course Description: This upper level course will explain primarily the major principles and structure of the American free-enterprise system and how it works. Laws of economic need and want, supply and demand, competition, prices, and wages and other important concepts will be taught. Students taking this course will have a basic knowledge and practical understanding of the American economy to take further courses in economics or business in college.

Course 1781
Sociology
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status
Course Description: This is an elective course in the study of human society and groups. The concepts of socialization, group behavior, and the characteristics of social groups will be taught. This course will provide the basis for further courses in the social sciences, social work, and other related areas in college.

Course 1750
Psychology
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status, Sophomore with permission by instructor
Course Description: Psychology is a semester course focusing on the study of human behavior. Topics include: parapsychology, personality, abnormal behavior, dealing with frustration and conflict, and behavior in groups.

Special Education

Course 6000
Resource
Length: 1 Year
Course Description: This program is a flexible teaching program to meet the needs of the individual students with different styles of learning. The teaching techniques used range from compensatory programming to vocational awareness. Accommodation(that is to adapt school practices to the learner) is a part of the compensatory effort. Tutoring, monitoring, development of study skills, and special taping are some strategies employed. Individualized programs on the computer provide for remediation as well as allowing for practice in using a computer.

Library

Course 1300
Media Lab
Length: 1 semester
Prerequisite: approval from instructor and the principal
Course Description: This is a hands on class where work is done in the library. Since there is no homework it is extremely difficult to make up work. It is very important that you are in class each day. Students will get a variety of experience. Students will work at the check out desk, help other students find and use materials, and help with the upkeep of the library. Many of the tasks done in the library will require the use of the computer. Students taking this class must be in high school. Any students taking this class must have approval from the instructor and the principal.

The mission of the Highland Community School District is to provide all students the opportunity to acquire the necessary skills to fulfill their potential and become positive contributors to society.
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